Menswear, Soccer, Guitar.

voxsart:

Sean Connery Just Saw Your Contrast Stitched Buttonhole.
Guess what he thinks.

voxsart:

Sean Connery Just Saw Your Contrast Stitched Buttonhole.

Guess what he thinks.


True Road Worn.

putthison:

Slimmer Clothes Don’t Necessarily Make You Look Slimmer
There’s no bigger myth in menswear today than the idea that slim clothes will make you look slimmer (or conversely, more voluminous clothes will make you look fatter). And since everyone wants to look like one of The Beautiful People, fashion writers keep churning out this terrible idea that slim clothes are for everyone, no matter how each of us are actually built.
Truthfully, I think clothes do very little to change how your body looks. A large guy will look large, and a short guy will look short, regardless of what they put on. The only thing clothes can do is not call attention to these facts. There are of course, a few exceptions – and they usually deal with sport coats or suit jackets, and how they can make a man look slightly more athletic or symmetrical than he really is – but for the most part, it’s true. Clothes will not make you look like a different person. 
Take a look at the photo above, for example, which shows France’s President Hollande shaking hands with Japan’s Emperor Akihito. Hollande’s suit demonstrates some of the problems that slim fitting clothes can have on a guy that’s neither slim nor athletically built. Slim jackets pucker and pull more easily, which can make your body look fatter than it actually is. Similarly, you’ll often see the same thing in trousers, where an overly slim cut can make your trousers catch on the back of your calves and ripple under your seat – neither of which will make you look particularly good.
Hollande’s trousers here fall cleaner, but they still make his feet look long and his torso heavy. For many guys, a slim suit can give them a silhouette that looks vaguely like a double Popsicle stick.
Emperor Akihito, on the other hand, is wearing a much fuller cut suit. Granted, he’s no Adonis himself, but the clean lines don’t call attention to this fact. Notice how his trousers, even if not fashionably slim, are well proportioned with his torso, and how his jacket give him a flattering build.
I wouldn’t go as far as to say that slim fitted suits are bad. On the right guys (usually slim or athletically built men), they look fantastic. For everyone else, tread lightly. As usual, you should always value fit over everything else, and for the most part, that means avoiding clothes that pull, pucker, bag, or otherwise create lines where there shouldn’t be. Slim clothes won’t necessarily make you look slimmer, but good tailoring will always make you look better.  
(Photo via Ivory Tower Style)

Praise The Lord for menswear sanity. Slim clothes aren’t for everyone.

putthison:

Slimmer Clothes Don’t Necessarily Make You Look Slimmer

There’s no bigger myth in menswear today than the idea that slim clothes will make you look slimmer (or conversely, more voluminous clothes will make you look fatter). And since everyone wants to look like one of The Beautiful People, fashion writers keep churning out this terrible idea that slim clothes are for everyone, no matter how each of us are actually built.

Truthfully, I think clothes do very little to change how your body looks. A large guy will look large, and a short guy will look short, regardless of what they put on. The only thing clothes can do is not call attention to these facts. There are of course, a few exceptions – and they usually deal with sport coats or suit jackets, and how they can make a man look slightly more athletic or symmetrical than he really is – but for the most part, it’s true. Clothes will not make you look like a different person. 

Take a look at the photo above, for example, which shows France’s President Hollande shaking hands with Japan’s Emperor Akihito. Hollande’s suit demonstrates some of the problems that slim fitting clothes can have on a guy that’s neither slim nor athletically built. Slim jackets pucker and pull more easily, which can make your body look fatter than it actually is. Similarly, you’ll often see the same thing in trousers, where an overly slim cut can make your trousers catch on the back of your calves and ripple under your seat – neither of which will make you look particularly good.

Hollande’s trousers here fall cleaner, but they still make his feet look long and his torso heavy. For many guys, a slim suit can give them a silhouette that looks vaguely like a double Popsicle stick.

Emperor Akihito, on the other hand, is wearing a much fuller cut suit. Granted, he’s no Adonis himself, but the clean lines don’t call attention to this fact. Notice how his trousers, even if not fashionably slim, are well proportioned with his torso, and how his jacket give him a flattering build.

I wouldn’t go as far as to say that slim fitted suits are bad. On the right guys (usually slim or athletically built men), they look fantastic. For everyone else, tread lightly. As usual, you should always value fit over everything else, and for the most part, that means avoiding clothes that pull, pucker, bag, or otherwise create lines where there shouldn’t be. Slim clothes won’t necessarily make you look slimmer, but good tailoring will always make you look better.  

(Photo via Ivory Tower Style)

Praise The Lord for menswear sanity. Slim clothes aren’t for everyone.

styleforumnet:

Vass bespoke: U last, Adelaide, HAF sole with flush metal toe caps, burgundy calf from Tanneries Du Puy

Just… Wow.

styleforumnet:

Vass bespoke: U last, Adelaide, HAF sole with flush metal toe caps, burgundy calf from Tanneries Du Puy

Just… Wow.

putthison:

Fragrances, Part Two: How to Choose Something for Yourself
In some ways, choosing a fragrance is straightforward: you pick something you’d want to wear. At the same time, there’s more to it than just sniffing the bottle.
The first thing you need to know is that fragrances react to your body and evolve over time. So when you’re out shopping for a scent, only use the blotter strips to see what you’d like to sample, and then spray no more than one scent per wrist. That way, your nose won’t be confused. As you wear those scents throughout the day, pay attention to how they change. Scents are described in a musical metaphor as having three sets of notes, which make up a harmonious scent accord. These notes are released over time:
Top notes: Also known as the head notes, these are what you smell upon immediate application. Top notes are very strong and assertive, and often a bit citrusy. I find them to be too strong when I’m in public, so I apply scents about five minutes before going outside. A scent’s top notes will have evaporated by then. 
Middle notes: Next are the middle notes, which typically last for about thirty minutes. Middle notes form the heart of a fragrance, and are usually much more well-rounded and mellow. 
Basenotes: A fragrance’s middle notes and basenotes form the real “theme” of a fragrance, which is why you need to give it time before you judge it. Basenotes start to come out after the first thirty minutes and will last until the scent disappears. 
In addition to paying attention to how something evolves, think about what you’re smelling and whether those scents are suitable for your needs. Things that smell very citrusy, floral, green, or aquatic, for example, might only be good for daytime use, or for the spring and summer seasons. Conversely, things that smell more like wood, amber, vanilla, or leather might be better for nighttime use, or for the fall and winter seasons. Whether something is right for you is as much about when you plan to wear it as it is about your personality.  
Once you’ve picked something, the rest is easy.
Storing: Fragrances are sensitive to light and heat, so store things in cool and dry places, and away from direct sunlight. On top your dresser is fine; on the dashboard of your car is not.
Application: Generally speaking, you want to spray fragrances about 3-6 inches away from your body, and directly on pulse points (so neck, inner elbow, or wrist). Remember, fragrances need to react to your body, so don’t apply scents to your clothes. I personally spray stuff on my wrist, and then lightly dab my wrists on my neck. (Rubbing is bad for the oils). Whatever you do, don’t spray fragrances into the air and walk through the mist. That does little more than freshen up the room.  
Amount: How much you apply is personal, and will depend on the strength of what you’re spraying. Some things require a bit more application; some things less. Obviously: when in doubt, always err on the side of caution. If you want something to last long, just get a longer lasting scent, rather than go wild with a weak one. 
Finally, if you want to try out a new scent, or just develop your nose, buy samplers before you buy bottles. Doing so can be a nice way to check things out without dropping too much money. The Perfumed Court is a popular online source for sample vials. You can also find good reviews at Basenotes, where there’s a large online community of enthusiasts.
(Pictured above: One of my favorites, Creed’s Green Irish Tweed)

putthison:

Fragrances, Part Two: How to Choose Something for Yourself

In some ways, choosing a fragrance is straightforward: you pick something you’d want to wear. At the same time, there’s more to it than just sniffing the bottle.

The first thing you need to know is that fragrances react to your body and evolve over time. So when you’re out shopping for a scent, only use the blotter strips to see what you’d like to sample, and then spray no more than one scent per wrist. That way, your nose won’t be confused. As you wear those scents throughout the day, pay attention to how they change. Scents are described in a musical metaphor as having three sets of notes, which make up a harmonious scent accord. These notes are released over time:

  • Top notes: Also known as the head notes, these are what you smell upon immediate application. Top notes are very strong and assertive, and often a bit citrusy. I find them to be too strong when I’m in public, so I apply scents about five minutes before going outside. A scent’s top notes will have evaporated by then. 
  • Middle notes: Next are the middle notes, which typically last for about thirty minutes. Middle notes form the heart of a fragrance, and are usually much more well-rounded and mellow. 
  • Basenotes: A fragrance’s middle notes and basenotes form the real “theme” of a fragrance, which is why you need to give it time before you judge it. Basenotes start to come out after the first thirty minutes and will last until the scent disappears. 

In addition to paying attention to how something evolves, think about what you’re smelling and whether those scents are suitable for your needs. Things that smell very citrusy, floral, green, or aquatic, for example, might only be good for daytime use, or for the spring and summer seasons. Conversely, things that smell more like wood, amber, vanilla, or leather might be better for nighttime use, or for the fall and winter seasons. Whether something is right for you is as much about when you plan to wear it as it is about your personality.  

Once you’ve picked something, the rest is easy.

  • Storing: Fragrances are sensitive to light and heat, so store things in cool and dry places, and away from direct sunlight. On top your dresser is fine; on the dashboard of your car is not.
  • Application: Generally speaking, you want to spray fragrances about 3-6 inches away from your body, and directly on pulse points (so neck, inner elbow, or wrist). Remember, fragrances need to react to your body, so don’t apply scents to your clothes. I personally spray stuff on my wrist, and then lightly dab my wrists on my neck. (Rubbing is bad for the oils). Whatever you do, don’t spray fragrances into the air and walk through the mist. That does little more than freshen up the room.  
  • Amount: How much you apply is personal, and will depend on the strength of what you’re spraying. Some things require a bit more application; some things less. Obviously: when in doubt, always err on the side of caution. If you want something to last long, just get a longer lasting scent, rather than go wild with a weak one. 

Finally, if you want to try out a new scent, or just develop your nose, buy samplers before you buy bottles. Doing so can be a nice way to check things out without dropping too much money. The Perfumed Court is a popular online source for sample vials. You can also find good reviews at Basenotes, where there’s a large online community of enthusiasts.

(Pictured above: One of my favorites, Creed’s Green Irish Tweed)

Epaulet Gunmetal Rivet ChinosEpaulet x Carmina Salinger Saddle Shell Double Monks

Epaulet Gunmetal Rivet Chinos
Epaulet x Carmina Salinger Saddle Shell Double Monks

Dual Strats. 

1) 2012 3TB John Mayer Signature. Swapped out tortoise guard for a mint green.

2) 2005 US Deluxe in Olympic Pearl.

Both reach massively different places, sonically, and serve as a great compliment to each other. One is hotrod vintage, the other a modern player. One leads me to endless tinkering, one is plug-in-and-go. And I love each of them for their individual idiosyncrasies. 

Both were bought used (as any good instrument should be).

Dual Strats.

1) 2012 3TB John Mayer Signature. Swapped out tortoise guard for a mint green.

2) 2005 US Deluxe in Olympic Pearl.

Both reach massively different places, sonically, and serve as a great compliment to each other. One is hotrod vintage, the other a modern player. One leads me to endless tinkering, one is plug-in-and-go. And I love each of them for their individual idiosyncrasies.

Both were bought used (as any good instrument should be).

Some knit-tie-&-collar-roll p0rn for the day.

Some knit-tie-&-collar-roll p0rn for the day.